Security Alert

March 9 Phishing Attempt

Thursday, March 9, 2017 many UA employees received phishing emails with the subject title “RE: Your Password Expires Today.”

This email is a phishing attempt designed to steal usernames and passwords, and to possibly infect your system with malicious code.  Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive this email, and you did click on the links to provide your username and password, please promptly change your myBama password and activate DUO at duo.ua.edu. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555.

Below is a screenshot of the email.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 6 Phishing Attempt

Monday, March 6, 2017 many UA employees received phishing emails with the subject title “Upgrade Your Ua.edu Account.”

This email is a phishing attempt designed to steal usernames and passwords, and to possibly infect your system with malicious code.  Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive this email, and you did click on the links to provide your username and password, please promptly change your myBama password and activate DUO at duo.ua.edu. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu.

Below is a screenshot of the email.

 

March 3 Phishing Attempts

Friday, March 3, 2017 many UA employees received phishing emails with the subject title “upgrade your account immediately” or “authentication requirements.”

These emails are phishing attempts designed to steal usernames and passwords, and to possibly infect your system with malicious code.  Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive one or both of these emails, and you did click on the links to provide your username and password, please promptly change your myBama password and activate DUO at duo.ua.edu. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu.

Below are screenshots of the emails.

 

 

Tax Related Identity Theft – What You Need to Know.

Tax-related identity theft occurs when someone uses your social security number to file a fraudulent tax return on your behalf.

How do I know if I am a victim?

Unfortunately, most people do not know if they are a victim of tax-related identity theft until after the crime has already been committed. Taxpayers find out if they are a victim when they file their taxes. Taxpayers will submit their tax annual documentation only to find that their taxes have already been filed, by someone else. According to the General Accountability Office, the IRS paid out $7 billion in false tax refunds in 2015. That’s $7 billion in the pockets of cyber hackers.

How can I avoid becoming a victim?

You are your own best defense. The only way you can become a victim of tax identity theft is if the criminal files an income tax return using your social security number before you do. The best defense? File your taxes as early as possible so the “bad guys” don’t have the option.  Please also follow the tips below to protect critical data, like your social security number.

Don’t be fooled by calls or emails posing as the IRS.

The IRS communicates via snail mail. Do not trust any emails, and do not click on links or attachments that are posing as the IRS.

Use Antivirus software.

OIT offers McAfee antivirus software for free at oit.ua.edu/software.

Keep an eye on your credit score.

Check your credit report every few months to ensure no one is making purchases, filing tax returns or posing as you.

What if this happens to me?

The IRS combats tax-related identity theft with an aggressive strategy of prevention, detection and victim assistance. Visit irs.gov for more information.

Feb. 9 Phishing Attempt

Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017 many UA students received emails with the subject title “Important Update” The email “from name” appeared to be IT Service Desk; however, the email address was unfortunately a compromised student account.

This email is a phishing attempt to usernames and passwords, and to possibly infect your system with malicious code. Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive the email, and you did click on the link to provide your username and password, please promptly change your myBama password and activate DUO at duo.ua.edu. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu.

Below is a screenshot of the email.

 

Feb. 7 Phishing Attempt

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2017 many UA employees, students and alumni received emails with the subject title “Important Announcement from President Dr. Stuart R. Bell” The email “from name” appeared to be Dr. Stuart R. Bell; however, the email address was from a compromised usc.edu account.

This email is a phishing attempt to usernames and passwords through a PDF and link. Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive the email, and you did respond to the email to provide your username, password or other sensitive data, please promptly change your myBama password and install DUO at duo.ua.edu. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu.

Below is a screenshot of the email.

 

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OIT Launches DUO Two-Factor Authentication for myBama

The UA Office of Information Technology and the UA Student Government Association have partnered to introduce a new program to protect the myBama credentials of students, faculty and staff.

DUO, a two-factor authentication program, adds a second layer of security to a user’s login. It requires two factors to verify identity. These factors include something you know – your username and password, and something you have – a smartphone app, to authenticate and gain access to an account.

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“How it works is that you would login to your myBama like you typically would,” said SGA Senate Chief of Staff Michael Cervino. “And then you would receive the DUO prompt. You can then have DUO send a notification to your phone and alert you that someone (hopefully you) is attempting to login to your myBama account. From there you either approve or deny the login.”

By activating DUO two-factor authentication, students, faculty and staff can better protect their myBama accounts from remote attackers and ensure account safety.

“Passwords no longer provide adequate protection for our sensitive data,” said Ashley Ewing, UA’s chief information security officer. “Malicious actors are compromising large numbers of user IDs and passwords from systems in hopes that the same ID and password are used on other systems.”

College students, as well as faculty and staff, are a top target for cyber hackers.

UA’s Office of Information Technology expects to see an extreme decrease in, and near elimination of compromised accounts after individuals install DUO.

“College students are attacked constantly,” said Ewing. “We’ve seen over 6,400 compromised accounts in the last couple of years. Students should be concerned about the protection of their sensitive data.”

More than 100 major universities use DUO including The University of Georgia, The University of Miami, and Duke University.

To get started, visit www.duo.ua.edu. You can then follow the screen prompts and download the DUO Mobile App on your smartphone to setup your DUO account. For more information and a complete tutorial, visit www.oit.ua.edu/duo.

Jan. 17 Phishing Attempt

Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017 many UA employees and students received emails with the subject title “Space Full” The email “from name” appeared to be a ua.edu email address; however, the email address was unfortunately a compromised account.

This email is a phishing attempt to usernames and passwords, and to possibly infect your system with malicious code. Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive the email, and you did respond to the email to provide your username, password or other sensitive data, please promptly change your myBama password. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu.

Below is a screenshot of the email.

 

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Jan. 10 Phishing Attempt

Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 many UA employees and students received emails with the subject title “Space!” The email “from name” appeared to be UA Alerts; however, the email address was unfortunately a compromised student account, not the official UA Alert system.

This email is a phishing attempt to usernames and passwords, and to possibly infect your system with malicious code. Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive the email, and you did respond to the email to provide your username, password or other sensitive data, please promptly change your myBama password. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu.

Below is a screenshot of the phishing email.

 

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Dec. 15 Phishing Attempt

Thursday, Dec. 15, 2016 many UA employees received emails with the subject title ”$200 Instant Pay Survey.”

This email is a phishing attempt to obtain personal information. Please remember that The University of Alabama does not send out these types of messages. If you haven’t already, please delete the email.

If you did receive the email, and you did respond to the email to provide your name, contact information or other sensitive data, please promptly change your myBama password. Please contact the IT Service Desk with questions and concerns 205-348-5555 or itsd@ua.edu. Below is a screenshot of the message.

 

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